A Netflix Documentary Series

Street Food

YEAR

2019

PRODUCTION COMPANY

Boardwalk/Supper Club

BROADCASTER

Netflix

EPISODES

9

RUNTIME

25+ min



From the creators of Chef’s Table, Street Food explores the rich culture of street food in some of the world’s most colorful cities. Season one explores nine countries across Asia, highlighting the stories of perseverance that bring each country’s cuisine and culture to life.

A Netflix Documentary Series

Created by Brian McGinn & David Gelb
Executive Produced by Brian McGinn, Andrew Fried and David Gelb
Produced by Tamara Rosenfeld, Daniel Milder and Suzy Beck
Directors of Photography Alex Paul & Matthew Chavez

Reviews:

“Netflix’s Street Food is even better than its sibling Chef’s Table…it manages to retain the best qualities of its predecessor while also breaking new ground. Each episode focuses on one chef who rose to culinary stardom by cooking highly personal cuisine, while also zooming out to show how they fit into a greater food scene along with other local vendors. Some moments of the show are heartbreaking, while others are so uplifting, you might find yourself hovering a few inches above the ground.”
— Eater

“The spirit of Anthony Bourdain is alive and well in these episodes…all that’s missing is the late, great host himself. But it takes nothing away from the subjects featured, whose long-overdue close-up will make you laugh, cry, and appreciate your local street vendor that much more.”
— Esquire

“This show, full of laughter, passion, and a fair bit of pain reflects the referendum laid down by Anthony Bourdain — to travel and explore the world and its flavors fearlessly and with compassion for the people whose lives you are (whether via this show or in person) an interloper in. Street Food dares you to open your mind to the simple and sublime in life through the most accessible and utilitarian food in the world…an unmitigated success.”
— UpRoxx

Street Food makes often invisible lives more visible…It celebrates these chefs’ work and their skill, and it doesn’t pretend that their lives have been easy or that their pain has somehow made their food better…Watch Street Food for all the usual reasons you watch travel food shows. Watch to learn about cuisines you don’t know, and to have some escapist food fantasies, and to appreciate the craft of unbelievably skilled chefs. But don’t be surprised if you come away from the show with a sense that, more than many food documentaries, this one is about things other than food — income inequality, desperation, demonstrations of will, and making food because you love it, but also because you need to work to survive.”
— Vulture/Grubstreet

“Food shows will never be the same again anyway, thanks to exemplary nine-part Netflix documentary series Street Food, which celebrates – you guessed it – some of the most evocative and irresistible dishes available on Asian road, avenue and byway.”
— South China Morning Post

“When I jotted my initial 5-star review in my notes for this show, I hesitated. Am I really going to give a food show five stars? After I thought about it more, I realized the problem was with this reviewer and not the show. If a television show moves you to tears with its artistry, it deserves praise. If you can’t imagine food TV being done any better than this, then it deserves the best possible rating. Street Food, the newest offering from Chef’s Table masterminds David Gelb and Brian McGinn has the lovely filmmaking and meticulous food porn shots that you have come to expect from them…but this series adds a sharp sociopolitical sensibility that makes for one of the most compelling food shows ever made. Street Food avoids feeling touristy, or worse, engaging in poverty porn, by allowing chefs to tell their stories in their own words. The camera never condescends to the chefs, but instead empowers them. The filmmakers never mythologize their subjects, but simply allow the meditative beauty of their work and the complexity of their life stories to speak for themselves.”
— Daily Dot






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